Intriguing History

Intriguing History connects people, events and places by period, century and a wide range of historic themes, across a 1000 years of British history.

A digital history that is growing and evolving over time as a project to research build and share a connected British history. Easy and quick to use, an accessible chronicle to help discover your own intriguing connections. A framework of history and events to help us all envisage the wider context in which our particular historical interests take place.

Discover make and explore your historical connections

Discover make and explore your connections, drawing upon our curated and catalogued  resources and growing collections. We can together help tell the story of the rich and varied  history of the UK  across five continents and ten centuries from the Romans to the present day.

Whether you are interested in a particular period, subject topic or theme from a family, national, global, local, social or special interest perspective we hope you will enjoy and participate in using sharing and contributing to this project.

Recent and New Additions and Updates

Recent additions new Themes and Historic Timeslines index here are being frequently created, updated and enhanced. Additions include  Intriguing People and New lists of British Monarchs and Prime Ministers, Featured themes include recent additions for Magna Carta 800 and Winston Churchill PM and Polymath A first cut of our integrated digital timeline and map for the War of the Roses now launched,and a new blog section .

 

British History

latest featured articles

Bank of England History

Bank of England History

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series British Finance and Banking History

Bank of England History next to the East India Company one of our oldest institutions and ironically as the old lady of Threadneedle Street one of the few ‘last men standing. Founded by an associate of Isaac Newton from Trinity College Cambridge days maybe not such a strange connection give Newton was Master of the Royal Mint. Rothschilds to the rescue, so many intriguing connections to an institution we think of as a steadying force. It was not always so. Find out more here…

Richard III Bosworth

Richard III Bosworth

This entry is part 1 of 6 in the series Plantagenet Monarchs

King Richard III Bosworth Field, where the King stood and faced the army of Henry Tudor and was defeated, his crown left tumbeld under a thorn bush, his body unceremoniously dumped at Grey Friars Leicester. This week is re-buried at Leicester Cathedral.

Great Fire of London 1666

Great Fire of London 1666

The Great Fire of London 1666, swept through a city laden with tinder dry timber houses and quaysides storing oils, pitches, coal and timber. With a strong east wind the conditions were set fine for a terrifying blaze.

Samuel Johnson and Hodge

Samuel Johnson and Hodge

This entry is part 5 of 4 in the series Intriguing London

Samuel Johnson and Hodge his cat remembered in Gough Sq London where Samuel Johnson lived and worked on his dictionary with Hodge in attendance.

James Brindley Canal Builder

James Brindley Canal Builder

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the series Industrial Revolution

James Brindley canal engineer whose work in canal engineering spanned a mere 13 years. How did he manage to achieve so much for the canal building era? His work can still be seen in the centre of Birmingham.

Spinning Jenny Industrial Revolution?

This entry is part 8 of 8 in the series Industrial Inventions and Innovations

Spinning Jenny Industrial Revolution, what was this invention and what impact did it have on the textile workers of 18th century Britain? Why was the invention necessary and how did it connect with John Kay’s Flying Shuttle?

Joint Stock Ownership and the Corporate entity

Joint Stock Ownership and the Corporate entity

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series Business Trade and Organisation Key Concepts

Joint Stock Companies grew once the restrictive trade practices endorsed by the Bubble Act o 1720 were repealed, no longer requiring a Royal Charter to form a Company that could trade its stock accelerated the growth of business ownership and success of British business trade and industry in attracting the capital needed to expand and develop successful businesses across the Empire on the back of the Industrial Revolution.

Military Cap Badge Identification Help Needed

Military Cap Badge Identification Help Needed

This entry is part 1 of 13 in the series Military Cap badges

Military cap badge identification can be tricky, can you help to identify this one sent to Intriguing History?

Battle of Fulford Gate 1066

Battle of Fulford Gate 1066

This entry is part 1 of 1 in the series 1066 The Normans are Coming

Harald Hardrada or was it Hardraada (the Ruthless) conspired with the disaffected Tostig brother of the rightful King, (according to the late King Edward anyway) sets out to conquer York. Without this battle would William of Normandy have ever become King and won at Hastings? Follow the great local projects at the site of the battle and find out how history turned on what we think of as minor skirmishes but were really significant Battles. Two Battles north in 5 days and a forced march up and back down his realm can topple a King and his kingdom.

Richard II King 1377-1399

Richard II King 1377-1399

This entry is part 2 of 6 in the series Plantagenet Monarchs

Richard II son of the Black Prince and Grandson of Edward III what kind of a King would he make coming to the throne at just 9 years old, confronting the Peasants Revolt and growing-up with the burden of kingship. Follow his timeline and chronology of the events that shape his life and impact on his kingdom.

William Tyndale

William Tyndale

William Tyndale appeared in 1526, determined to translate the New Testament into English but why was this so important? How did King Henry VIII deal with Tyndale was he supportive of him or did he see him as a heretic?

Crossbones Graveyard

Crossbones Graveyard

This entry is part 3 of 4 in the series Intriguing London

Crossbones graveyard in Southwark is adorned with colourful ribbons, a tribute to those Winchester Geese and others who exist on the margins of society. This burial ground has been in existence since Medieval times.