12th Century 110-1199 CE

A time of religious conflict and scholastic advances in Europe. A century of pilgrimage.

  • English Medieval Pilgrimage
  • Cult of the Virgin Mary
  • Medieval Music in Britain
  • Medieval Women, Hodierna Mother of Alexander Neckham
  • Medieval Woman Eleanor of Aquitaine Part 1
  • Knights Templar at Fordingbridge
  • Hampshire ‘Feet of Fines’
  • Harthacnut King of the Danes and the English
  • Building The Tower of London
  • Copyhold Tenure what does it mean?
  • Evolution of the Anglo Saxon Chronicle
  • Temple Church London 1185-2012
  • The Crusades A Background
  • Eleanor of Aquitaine Mother of English Kings
  • Have you got Plantagenet Ancestors?
  • Angevin and Plantagenet Empire
  • Thomas Becket and Henry II
  • Harold I Harefoot King of England

The 12th Century brought a time of religious conflict and scholastic advances across the world. It was the great age of pilgrimage. The Crusades to the Holy Land, became an absorbing quest for many of Europes rulers. led to the formation of orders of knights, to protect and take care of the pilgrims travelling to the Holy Land. As the century unfolds the Knights Templar and the Knights Hospitaller, become landowners and bankers.

The first European University is established in Bologna and the school of thought known as Scholasticism is born.

This develops to become the dominant philosophy of learning in Medieval Europe, an approach to learning involving discussion and debate. It goes hand in glove with the emergence of more universities and forms the basis for religious and Medieval dogma.

Death of Henry I creates a state of conflict in England during ‘The Anarchy’

On the death of King Henry I, England is thrown into a state of civil unrest as Matilda and Stephen fight for supremacy. The Anarchy has begun.

Around the world literacy levels are increasing and China produces the first hand stitched books.

King Arthur is introduced to the English, in the writings of Geoffrey of Monmouth who wrote the ‘History of the Kings of Britain’. Europeans start translating Arabic texts of geometry and the science of mathematics is born, profoundly changing the course of development in Europe. The art, culture and teachings of the Islamic world begin to increase their influence European culture.

Great Cathedrals rise from the ground and an infamous murder takes place in one of them.

Thomas Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury was murdered in Canterbury Cathedral by four knights of the court of King Henry II.

By the end of the 12th Century, the Crusader army has been defeated by Saladin and the fall of Jerusalem causes Pope Gregory to call for a crusade.

Richard the Lionheart swears to liberate Jerusalem but is thwarted in his attempt.

Our 12th century chronology and timelines are being created and curated but already via each century page you can quickly locate our collections for each 100 years of history. These evolve as we explore topical themes, but if you are looking for something you can’t see here then please feel free to contact us and request.

 

English Medieval Pilgrimage

English Medieval Pilgrimage

The English Medieval pilgrimage holds up a mirror to what life was really like in Britain during these fraught and terrifying times. Who undertook these journeys and why?

Cult of the Virgin Mary

Cult of the Virgin Mary

The Cult of the Virgin Mary is seen by many as having it’s origins in the Medieval period but the mythologizing of Mary began with Pope Gregory I. It grew as the Crusaders returned to the west and shrines and icons to the Virgin Mary appeared in churches, on the wayside and in people’s homes.

The Cult of Chivalry

The Cult of Chivalry

The cult of chivalry was born out of the military culture that existed in the 11th century Chivalry was a code of honour for military warriors to follow. These men came from part of the elite ‘aristocratic’ society that existed at the time. Quite literally, the word chivalry came from the French word ‘chevalerie’ meaning…

Matilda of England

Matilda of England

This entry is part 15 of 15 in the series Intriguing Women

Who was Matilda of England and what role did she play in the turbulent house of the Plantangenets?

Fair Rosamund

Fair Rosamund

This entry is part 14 of 15 in the series Intriguing Women

Fair Rosamund, another intriguing woman of the Plantagenet period. Mistress of King Henry II but just why was she so important in his life?

Medieval Music in Britain

Medieval Music in Britain

This entry is part 1 of 2 in the series Intriguing Resources

Directly access this expert published work online for an authoritative view of the history of Medieval Music.This is by Frank Harrison a 19th cetury Senior Lecturer in Music at Oxford University. If you have discovered or would like to explore the wonders of British Medieval Music, Sacred Music or Polyphony then this is a great starting point. Click to access directly from here…an intriguing resource free to access and use online or to download.

King John vs the Church

King John vs the Church

This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Magna Carta

King John vs the church, is this what was behind King Johns road towards Magna Carta? Was this a King who did not fear God and a country little bothered by it’s isolation from Rome?

Fontevraud Abbey and The Plantagenets

Fontevraud Abbey and The Plantagenets

This entry is part 2 of 5 in the series Magna Carta

What is the connection between Fontevraud Abbey and the Plantagenet rulers of the 12th and 13th century and why are two kings and two queens buried there?

Isabella of Gloucester The First Wife of King John

Isabella of Gloucester The First Wife of King John

Isabella of Gloucester, first wife of King John, was a survivor. A rich and potentially powerful woman, we know little about Isabella, another forgotten Medieval woman whose role in historical events is lost.

Medieval Women, Hodierna Mother of Alexander Neckham

Medieval Women, Hodierna Mother of Alexander Neckham

This entry is part 1 of 15 in the series Intriguing Women

Another Medieval woman of some count was Hodierna, wet nurse to King Richard I (the Lionheart) or Coeur de Lion and mother of the scientist and theologian Alexander Neckham