The 3rd Century is critical in terms of the spread of Christianity, will the faith implode or will it muster yet more believers to it’s cause?

  • Cult of the Virgin Mary
  • Carausius and Allectus

About five percent of people within the Roman Empire have become Christian. Christians are increasingly under attack for refusing to take part in ceremonies to appease Rome’s gods and with economic problems by the score, the people of Rome are blaming Christians for the anger of the gods. A wave of executions takes place.

Can Christianity survive such an onslaught inside the Roman Empire?

As the executions take place and the Christians go meekly to their maker, Romans are impressed by the willingness of Christians to suffer and die for what they believe in. Many see the Roman Empire itself as more of an enemy than the Christians.

Rome is in chaos.

The constant struggle for power has left the Empire poorly managed and it’s troops and people exhausted. As a result, economic activity has declined. Roads, buildings and the infrastructure are deteriorating and cities have become smaller. There is little money to pay the soldiers and Emperor after Emperor has debased the currency. This causes suffering amongst the general population. Theft, piracy and pillaging, such is life in Rome in the 3rd Century. Christianity offers people an alternative way of life.

The 3rd Century  A brief chronology and timeline of the 2nd century of British History will follow shortly

Our century by century chronologies and timelines are being created and curated but already via each century page you can quickly locate our collections for each 100 years of history. These evolve as we explore topical themes, but if you are looking for something you can’t see here then please feel free to contact us and request, Thanks for taking a look.

 

Carausius and Allectus

Carausius and Allectus

This entry is part 6 of 9 in the series Roman Timeline

Carausius and Allectus are known as the Roman usurpers who took control of Britain in 286 AD. Coins are the only real evidence we have of their limited tenure in Britain.