Map your history, make new connections and gain insights for family, local or special interest projects

THEMES Artifacts, objects and documents

Queen Elizabeth I Statue London

Queen Elizabeth I statue
This entry is part 4 of 5 in the series Intriguing London

The Queen Elizabeth I statue in London is that city’s oldest outdoor statue but it no longer stands where it was intended. It was re-positioned in the 1920’s and unveiled by Millicent Fawcett, the noted feminist.

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King John’s Will

King John's Will

King John’s will or testament is held in the Worcester Cathedral archive, it is the oldest original will of any English monarch and is concerned with securing succession.

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WW1 Postcards

WW1 Postcards a rich resource and a visual opportunity, find out how to discover and use the 20K plus postcards on Europeana for the period 1914-1918 and muse over how you might dig-out what ephemera you might have in your loft or research boxes that might help you and others connect and make that next step n researching your project wehther for your family history social, local or special interest project. In the first year of the 100th centenary of WW1 will there ever be such an opportunity to explore and discover what happened and better understand those momentous events?

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Operation War Diary

Operation War Diary is a crowd sourced project to classify the WWI diaries of the British Army on the Western Front. A project involving the Imperial War Museum and the National Archive.

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Resources for Research Pipe rolls of the Exchequor.

Copyhold document

Sharing history resources. Sharing resources available for open access research and analysis in your history and humanities project is part of what we aim to do in conjunction with a Digital Gazetteer we are actively researching and developing as part of the Hampshire History Project. When we find a resource that maybe useful to others…

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Royal Arms In Church

Arms King James I

Royal Arms can be found in many English parish churches but are easy to overlook. The question is what was their purpose and what can we learn about English history by studying them?

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